Wellington College

Wellington College Belfast

Co-Educational Grammar School

Engage | Educate | Empower

Sociology

Sociology

The study of Sociology focuses on contemporary society and provides an awareness of the importance of social structure in explaining social issues. Students are encouraged to develop their own sociological awareness through active engagement with the contemporary world. The specification is designed to encourage students to acquire an understanding of social change; understand the research process within Sociology; and to develop a lifelong interest in social issues.

Please note:

  • The A-Level Sociology is a NEW A-Level and pupils must read up carefully on what it entails….
  • The A-Level Sociology course will complement those pupils doing A-Level Politics, A-Level Media Studies and A-Level RE (ethics).

Why choose A-level Sociology?

This AQA qualification offers an engaging and effective introduction to Sociology. Students will learn the fundamentals of the subject and develop skills valued by higher education (HE) and employers, including critical analysis, independent thinking and research.

 

A-level Subject content

(Compulsory content) 4.1 Education with Theory and Methods

  • 4.1.1 Education
  • 4.1.2 Methods in Context
  • 4.1.3 Theory and Methods

Students are expected to be familiar with:

  • the role and functions of the education system;
  • different educational achievement by social class, gender + ethnicity;
  • relationships within schools: the hidden curriculum,
  • educational policies.

(Compulsory content) 4.3 Crime and Deviance

  • 4.3.1 Crime and Deviance
  • 4.3.2 Theory and Methods

Students are expected to be familiar with:

  • crime, deviance, social order and social control
  • globalisation and crime in contemporary society;
  • crime control, prevention and punishment.

(Optional) 4.2 Topics in Sociology

Option 1 - Section A: one from option 1

  • 4.2.1 Culture and Identity
  • 4.2.2 Families and Households
  • 4.2.3 Health
  • 4.2.4 Work, Poverty and Welfare SS

Chosen option - 4.2.2 Families and Households

Students are expected to be familiar with sociological explanations of the following content:

  • the relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies
  • changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, childbearing and the life course, including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and household structures
  • gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society
  • the nature of childhood, and changes in the status of children in the family and society
  • demographic trends in the United Kingdom since 1900: birth rates, death rates, family size, life expectancy, ageing population, and migration and globalisation.

Option 2 - Section B: one from option 2

  • 4.2.5 Beliefs in Society
  • 4.2.6 Global Development
  • 4.2.7 The Media
  • 4.2.8 Stratification and Differentiation

Chosen option - 4.2.7 The Media

Students are expected to be familiar with sociological explanations of the following content:

  • the new media and the role of the media in contemporary society
  • the relationship between ownership and control of the media
  • the media, globalisation and popular culture
  • the processes of selection and presentation of the content of the news
  • media representations of age, social class, ethnicity, gender, sexuality and disability
  • the relationship between the media, their content and presentation, and audiences.

AS (one-year course for the AS qualification)

Paper 1: Education with Methods in Context (60 marks) 1 hour 30 minutes written exam

Paper 2: Research Methods and Topics in Sociology (60 marks) 1 hour 30 minutes written exam

Assessment Format: A2 (full two-year A-Level qualification)

Paper 1: Education with Theory and Methods (80 marks) 2 hour written exam

Paper 2: Topics in Sociology (80 marks) 2 hour written exam

Paper 3: Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods (80 marks) 2 hour written exam